Prof. Ludger Brümmer

Professor for Composition for Digital Media

Prof. Ludger Brümmer
Landeszentrum MUSIK–DESIGN–PERFORMANCE

Staatliche Hochschule für Musik
Schultheiß-Koch-Platz 3
78647 Trossingen

Phone +49 (0) 7425 9491-52
E-Mail ludger.bruemmer@mh-trossingen.de

  • Since 2017 Professor for Composition for Digital Media at the Landeszentrum MUSIK–DESIGN–PERFORMANCE
  • First studied music, art and pedagogy in Bochum, later composition at the Folkwang Hochschule Essen
  • Since April 2003 Director of the Institute for Music and Acoustics and since 2018 Director of the Hertz Laboratory at the Zentrum für Kunst und Medien (ZKM) in Karlsruhe
  • Artistic fields of activity: spatial sound, physical models, granular synthesis, media composition with different audiovisual contents (3D, video, interactivity, live video)

Lectures in the Winter Terms 2019/20

Werkzeuge der digitalen Klanggestaltung und deren Anwendung | Synchronisation von Bild und Ton | Grundlagen des Mehrkanaltons | Musik mit Circuit-Bending | Theorie instrumentaler und elektronischer Musik | Grundlagen des Sounddesigns und der Sprachgestaltung | Praktische Umsetzung von Konzepten der Klanginteraktion | Konzeption interaktiver Musiksysteme | Entwicklung künstlerischer Prozesse im Team | Erstellung von einfachen Soundalikes | Umsetzung von Performance-, Installations- und Live Electronic Konzepten | Entwicklung einfacher interaktiver Musiksysteme | Fähigkeit, über die eigene kreative Arbeit und die kreative Arbeit anderer zu reflektieren und konstruktiv zu diskutieren. Das Wintersemester steht unter dem Motto „Raumklang“. Es entstehen lineare sowie interaktive Spatial-Sound-Arbeiten.

SIEHE MD-STUNDENPLAN | PROF. FLORIAN KÄPPLER, PROF. THORSTEN GREINER, PROF. LUDGER BRÜMMER, PROF. OLAF TARANCZEWSKI, JÜRGEN SWOBODA

Vielfältige Angebote an den Schnittstellen Musik und Medien. Einige der Wahloptionen öffnen sich für die Gesamthochschule.

ZUORDNUNG: Studierende Musikdesign und Musicdesign sowie andere Studierende der Fakultät digitale Medien (HFU). LP N.V

KONKRETE ANGEBOTE VOR BEGINN DES WS, PROAKTIVE AUSKUNFT ÜBER ANDREAS BRAND: BRAND@MUSIKDESIGN.NET | PROF. FLORIAN KÄPPLER, PROF. THORSTEN GREINER, PROF. OLAF TARANCZEWSKI, PROF. LUDGER BRÜMMER, ANDREAS BRAND

Video Interview with Ludger Brümmer

Three Short Questions to Ludger Brümmer

You have been Professor of Composition for Digital Media at the Landeszentrum MUSIK-DESIGN-PERFORMANCE since 2017. During your own composition studies, however, the digital has not yet played this role. How does digitalization change composition?

While I was studying at the Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen, Germany, the digital age was just beginning. The most interesting thing for me was to make music that was previously unthinkable. The instrument in the studio was a five meter wide "altar" stuffed with modular analog synthesizers. Next to it stood a computer the size of a wardrobe that could only display green letters. After my studies I went to Stanford University in the heart of Silicon Valley, where I could use the latest computer, the "NeXt Cube", and learned that a programming language is a compositional tool. Technology used to be very exclusive, accessible to only a few people. This has changed radically. Every student can carry a studio around with him and has a computer in his pocket that would have cost 1,000,000 € in the 90s. You can use software that produces the most amazing sounds in the shortest time.

And here I come to aesthetics. In the 1980s, the avant-garde was a leading art that formulated aesthetic ideals that were very far removed from the "normal," an elite art that also defended quality demands. I have always found this art stimulating, because I found much that was new and incomprehensible in it. While electronic music was the avant-garde's hope for further development, today we can say that this hope has not been fulfilled. Digital music and the ex-avant-garde have completely split apart and for me what happens in digital music is much more alive, creative and exciting. Ultimately, digital has accelerated the pace of technological innovation. It allows me to directly access any sample, but also to realize mathematical concepts and artificial intelligence on a sonic or compositional level.

You have been head of the Institute for Music and Acoustics at the ZKM in Karlsruhe since 2003. Do you see synergy effects between your work at the ZKM and the professorship at the Landeszentrum?

At the moment I can provide the students in Trossingen with the results of some ZKM research projects, installations or even software developed in the ZKM and integrate them into their lessons. On the other hand, in Trossingen we can also give valuable feedback to the developers. In February we spent an afternoon in the sound dome of the ZKM with the spatial sound seminar. The students were able to listen to their own works under optimal conditions and also understand what spatial sound actually means. Unfortunately, the sound dome in Trossingen has not yet found an optimal location.

What makes the phenomenon of spatial sound so attractive to you?

Spatial sound was originally initiated by architecture. Adrian Willaert already practiced sound in San Marco in the 16th century by placing the choir in up to eight groups throughout the room. The next impulse for spatial sound was given by the separation of sound generation and sound reproduction: with the loudspeaker, sound can be positioned anywhere. Finally, simulations made it possible to set the sound in any desired motion. Music for spatial sound creates an immersive sound event: the listener is surrounded by sound. It always impresses me when the music hovers and moves around me, when a dense sound event with 30 or 40 sound sources distributed throughout the room can be heard. This sound density and complexity would not be perceptible without spatial sound systems.

Further Professors of the Landeszentrum